Advice and Consent

Unit of 4 Lessons
Grade Levels: 
6
7
8
Subjects: 
Language Arts
Philanthropy
Social Studies
Media / Technology
Issue Area: 
Democracy
Focus Question 

 Focus Question: Why is it important for people to stay informed and participate in government processes? What are some ways to participate at the local level?

Photo credit:  US Constitution by Kim Davies is licensed under CC by 2.0

Unit Overview 

Students explore the importance of limited government and citizen participation in their communities for the common good. Students research the local community foundation, raise funds, and learn parliamentary procedure. They explore the role of Youth Advisory Councils.

Service Experience 
Students design posters to illustrate the work of foundations and display the information for other classes in the school (see Lesson Two: Who Should Do It?).   The learners raise funds in a one-day fundraiser, conduct a survey to determine community need, complete a grant application, present their request to a board of directors, and fund a project for the common good.
Lessons in This Unit 
Unit: 
Advice and Consent
Lesson 1 of 4
Grades: 
6
7
8

Even the person viewed as the most powerful person in the world does not have unlimited power. Constitutionally, the president of the United States is limited by the "advice and consent" rule (and other checks and balances). The learners look at the importance of limiting government and identify how the common good benefits when citizens and students participate in their communities.

Unit: 
Advice and Consent
Lesson 2 of 4
Grades: 
6
7
8

Students identify and compare the different roles of the four sectors of the economy (government, business, nonprofit, and family). They identify which sector does what and observe how they approach differently the sometimes overlapping responsibilities. Students describe the work of foundations and state the purpose of an organization's mission statement.