Learning to Give, Philanthropy education resources that teach giving and civic engagement


Legend: Red Square is Womens Perspective, Purple Triangle is African American Perspective, Aqua Circle is 'Everyday' Philanthropist

Philanthropy Briefing Papers

The Philanthropy Briefing Papers are abbreviated snapshots of significant concepts, people and organizations linked with philanthropy.

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Briefing Paper Women's Perspective African American Perspective 'Everyday' Philanthropist
Adams, John Quincy
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A glimpse at the life of the former president, highlighting his passion in the constitution as seen in the "Gag Rule" and the Amistad Case, a milestone in the long struggle against slavery and for the establishment of basic civil rights.

  African American Perspective  
Adamson, Rebecca
Rebecca L. Adamson, founder and president of the First Nations Development Institute, promotes economic self-sufficiency and sovereignty development of Native American tribes. More >>

Rebecca L. Adamson, founder and president of the First Nations Development Institute, believes that Native Americans should be in control of their own schools and education, and has served a promoter of economic independence for tribes. She continues to work directly with the tribes and assists them in finding the most sufficient ways of developing successful small businesses and economies apart from the Federal Government without compromising their customs.

Women's Perspective    
Addams, Jane
An overview of Jane Addams and her philanthropic work,advocacy efforts and involvement in social movements. More >>

Advocate for immigrants, the poor, women and peace, Jane Addams founded the first settlement house in the United States and was also a shrewd businesswoman, expert fundraiser and excellent publicity agent.

Women's Perspective    
Annenberg, Walter
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Walter Annenberg (1908-2002) was a media magnet and well-known for the creation of TV Guide. He was also very active in the arena of American politics and was a conservative supporter of political causes throughout the years. It is estimated that Annenberg gave over $2 billion in his lifetime, focusing on the arts and edcuation.

     
Anthony, Susan B.
An historical overview of the philanthropic work of Susan B. Anthony and her contributions to the Temperance, Abolitionist and Suffrage Movements. More >>

Best remembered as an advocate for women's voting rights and as a founder of the Suffrage movement, Susan B. Anthony was also active in the Temperance and Abolitionist movements. She was a woman ahead of her times who believed that women deserved every right that was given to male citizens, including the right to an education.

Women's Perspective    
Bahuguna, Sunderlal
Sunderlal Bahuguna is an eco-activist from India who has spent his life working to educate Indian villagers, protesting against ecological destruction by the government and protecting the Himalayan Mountains. More >>

Sunderlal Bahuguna has contributed globally through awareness raising measures concerning deforestation, the negative effects of liquor on mountain life, and the health of the Ganges River. He will be most remembered in history for igniting a grassroots movement for protecting the environment.

     
Baker, Howard
An historical view of Howard Baker; a philanthropist with a love for his native Detroit and a desire to give something back. More >>

A self-made millionaire who attended school through the eighth grade, Howard Baker nonetheless valued higher education. Combining his love for his native Detroit and its people with his desire to give something back, he endowed the Howard Baker Foundation with $5 million to provide financial assistance for needy, minority Detroit-area youth intending to pursue an education at Wayne State University.

  African American Perspective 'Everyday' Philanthropist
Barrett, Kate Harwood Waller
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Dr. Kate Harwood Waller Barrett (1858-1925) devoted her life to young women in crisis who were in need of maternity care, housing, education and support. Her passion as well as her extensive knowledge of medicine allowed her to become one of the most credible women's reformers of her time.

Women's Perspective    
Barton, Clara
Teacher, self-taught nurse, humanitarian, lobbyist, writer and founder of the American Red Cross, Clara Barton worked tenaciously for volunteer efforts her entire life. More >>

Teacher, self-taught nurse, humanitarian, lobbyist, writer and founder of the American Red Cross, Clara Barton worked tenaciously for volunteer efforts her entire life.

Women's Perspective    
Beecher, Catharine Esther
A philanthropic overview of Catharine Esther Beecher and her dedication to providing educational opportunities for young women. More >>

Catharine Esther Beecher was a driving force in the development of teacher education and formal education for women in America. Motivated by her dedication to providing educational opportunities for young women, Beecher established, or inspired the establishment of, a number of schools in the Midwest. Yet, she was not a suffragist, and believed the acceptable and most powerful positions for women were as domestic role models and teachers of the next generation. Her writings promoted domestic science as a necessary part of the educational curriculum for women.

Women's Perspective    
Benezet, Anthony
Anthony Benezet as a philanthropist who exposed injustices in early American society particularly those endured by African Americans, women and Native Americans. More >>

Anthony Benezet (1713 - 1784) was an educator, writer and philanthropist who exposed injustices in early American society particularly those endured by African Americans, women and Native Americans. He established a school for girls and one for African Americans (today, known as the Benezet House Association). His works, A Caution and Warning to Great Britain and Her Colonies of the Calamitous State of the Enslaved Negroes (1767) and Some Historical Account of Guinea (1771) inspired English protests against slavery.

     
Bergh, Henry
Henry Bergh, founder of both the animal and child protection movements in the United States, was both honored and reviled for his work in the later half of the 19th century. He is best known as the founder of the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals in 1866. More >>

Henry Bergh founded the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) in 1866. He introduced Americans to the organized protection of animals. Several thousand humane groups now exist thanks to Bergh's vision and influence.

     
Bethune, Mary McLeod
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Mary McLeod Bethune (1875-1955), born to former slaves a decade after the Civil War, devoted her life to ensure the right to education and freedom from discrimination for black Americans. She was an educator, an organizer, and a political activist, and opened one of the first schools for African American girls.

Women's Perspective African American Perspective  
Blaker, Eliza Ann
Eliza Ann Blaker as a philanthropist and pioneer who shaped public education when she established and served as the superintendent of Indianapolis' free kindergartens. More >>

Eliza Ann Blaker (1854-1926) was a pioneer who shaped public education when she established and served as the superintendent of Indianapolis' free kindergartens, providing education and social services for the growing city's poor families. Blaker also established Teacher's College (which later became the elementary department of Butler University's School of Education).

Women's Perspective    
Booth, Evangeline
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Driven by her faith, Booth devoted her life to selfless service to help the poor and less fortunate. She played a significant role in establishing the prominence and respect of the American Salvation Army, an organization she led for thirty years.

Women's Perspective    
Booth, Maud Ballington
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Booth (1865-1948) is best known as the cofounder of the Volunteers of America, an organization with the mission to reach and uplift all people. Coupled with her husband, Ballington Booth, Maud dedicated her life's work to helping others. She was also significant in the area of prison reform.

Women's Perspective    
Bush, George Herbert Walker
The father of the modern service movement, President Bush envisioned “a thousand points of light” and identified philanthropy, civic action for the common good and the civil society sector as part of the fabric of democracy. The Bush family is dedicated to service. More >>

George H. W. Bush, 41st President of the United States, has been recognized as the father of the modern service movement. In his 1989 Inaugural Address he envisioned "a thousand points of light"Ã"šÃ" and identified philanthropy and the civil society sector as vital parts of the fabric of the United States and of democracy.

     
Candler, Asa Griggs
The philanthropic contributions of the founder of the Cola-Cola company, Asa Candler. More >>

When people hear the name Asa Griggs Candler (1851-1929), they think of the founder of the Cola-Cola company, but he was much more than that. He "saw his personal wealth as a divine trust to be used to the benefit of humanity." One of the lasting monuments that Asa made in his community was a new 275-bed building for the Wesley Memorial Hospital, now called Emory University Hospital (Emory Healthcare 2003). Today, the hospital is considered one of the ten best hospitals in America.

     
Canepa, John C.
John Canepa served as a leader of urban renewal in downtown Grand Rapids, Michigan. His philanthropy included an emphasis on bringing the arts to downtown development. More >>

John Canepa served in the banking industry as president and CEO of Old Kent Bank in Grand Rapids, Michigan. His community building influence is important in Grand Rapids as a member of the Downtown Development Authority and Grand Action. He led efforts to bring to downtown some of Grand Rapids' major cultural and business organizations, such as the Grand Rapids Symphony and the Grand Rapids Art Museum. The success of downtown revitalization has brought business and visitors to West Michigan and improved opportunities for its residents.

    'Everyday' Philanthropist
Carnegie, Andrew
An historical overview of Andrew Carnegie as one of the most successful businessmen and most recognized philanthropists in history. More >>

Andrew Carnegie (1835-1919) was one of the most successful businessmen and most recognized philanthropists in history. His entrepreneurial ventures in America's steel industry earned him millions and he, in turn, made great contributions to social causes such as public libraries, education and international peace. He is responsible for the construction and donation of approximately 2,509 public libraries in the United States, Europe and around the world.

     
Carson, Rachel
Rachel Carson's work as a scientist, prolific and respected writer, and one of the first high-exposure environmental activists. More >>

Rachel Carson (1907-1964) was a scientist, prolific and respected writer, and one of the first high-exposure environmental activists. Carson's most controversial work, Silent Spring (1962), was an exposÃÆ'Ã"© of DDT and related pesticides; it inspired President John F. Kennedy to establish a subcommittee of the President's Science Advisory Committee to explore the effects of pesticides. The report confirmed Carson's work and validated the need for future research and legislation. Carson wrote many articles and best-selling books including Under the Sea Wind, The Sea Around Us (1951), and The Edge of the Sea (1955), making science accessible to the public through her clear writing and stimulating interest in the natural world through vivid prose. She was the recipient of many awards related to literature or environmental protection.

Women's Perspective    
Carter, James Earl, Jr. (Jimmy Carter)
An overview of Jimmy Carter as a philanthropist and well known advocate of human rights. More >>

As President of the United States, Carter is perhaps most well known as an advocate of human rights who attempted to improve peace in the U.S. and the world. Following his presidency, Carter continued to promote peace, human rights and opportunities for the underprivileged and has been deeply involved with Habitat for Humanity since 1984 (a nonprofit, ecumenical Christian housing ministry dedicated to eliminating substandard housing).

     
Carver, George Washington
George Washington Carver and his work as a philanthropist, educator and empowerer of farmers in agricultural techniques. More >>

George Washington Carver (1860? - 1943) was a teacher, agricultural scientist and inventor who served Tuskegee Institute in Alabama for forty-seven years. He made many contributions to the world and the environment by creating more than 300 peanut-based products, numerous developments for the sweet potato, and, foremost, developing revolutionary crop rotation theory that helped conserve land from overuse. He educated and empowered farmers in agricultural techniques, particularly in the American South and founded the Carver Research Foundation.

     
Chadwick, Alan
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Established the Center for Agroecology and Sustainable Food Systems, a world renowned research center in helping third world farmers use organic gardening to obtain high yields of food in small spaces with a minimal use of chemicals. Chadwick was instrumental in the agroecology and organic gardening movement.

     
Chvez, Csar
Cesar Chavez's dedication to improving the working conditions of migrant farm workers in America and advancing the ideals of equality and civil rights for everyone. More >>

Cesar Chavez dedicated his life to serving humanity by improving the working conditions of migrant farm workers in America and advancing the ideals of equality and civil rights for everyone. In 1962, Cesar Chavez founded the National Farm Workers Association (NFWA), later renamed the United Farm Workers (UFW). The UFW became the voice of migrant farm workers throughout the United States.

     
Cook, Peter C.
Peter Cook served as a major philanthropist in Grand Rapids, Michigan, where he generously supported universities and health organizations. More >>

After establishing his wealth in the automobile import business, Peter Cook formed a foundation and became a significant contributor to local universities, hospitals, and major cultural institutions in Grand Rapids, Michigan. He founded the Butterworth Foundation. His name is found on buildings at Porter Hills Retirement Village, Van Andel Institute, and Hope College. He also supported Opera Grand Rapids, Grand Valley State University, the zoo, and much more.

    'Everyday' Philanthropist
Cuffe, Paul
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Cuffe, a philanthropist and abolotionist, was more than 50 years ahead of his time by recognizing the need for African-Americans to be granted personal freedoms and a voice in the United States government. During the early 19th century, he was uniquely wealthy for an African-American and used his skills, intellect, ingenuity and relationships to advance important opportunities for minorities.

  African American Perspective  
Dawson, Matel
An extraordinary story of an average American, Matel Dawson Jr., who gave away $1.3 million dollars to charity over his lifetime eventhough he earned no more than $100,000 a year. More >>

An average American but an extraordinary philanthropist, Matel Dawson Jr. (1921-2002) gave away $1.3 million dollars to charity over his lifetime. Though he earned no more than $100,000 a year, his donations helped fund activities at Detroit-area and Louisiana churches and scholarships at Wayne State University. Other recipients of Dawsonââ"¬â"¢s generosity included the United Negro College Fund, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, and various local colleges.

  African American Perspective 'Everyday' Philanthropist
Day, Dorothy
The philanthropic work of Dorothy Day and her efforts with the Catholic Worker Movement. More >>

The woman who is best known for her efforts with the Catholic Worker Movement.

  African American Perspective 'Everyday' Philanthropist
de Tocqueville, Alexis
An historical overview of Frenchman Alexis de Tocqueville and his journey through America in the 1800's. More >>

The Frenchman who studied and addressed early American democracy.

     
Deloria, Vine, Jr.
The philanthropic influence of Vine Deloria Jr., one of the best-known American Indian activists of the 20th century. More >>

Through out his life, Vine Deloria Jr. strove to make a difference in the lives of the American Indian people. As an activist, advocate, author, and professor, he was able to promote valuable changes in people's lives and perceptions.

     
Denver, John
John Denver was one of the most popular singer-songwriters in the United States. He used his celebrity and the financial resources that it provided him to support several organizations focused on environmental and wildlife preservation. More >>

John Denver is important to the cause of animal welfare, and to conservation in general because he was a cultural icon whose words and behaviors were very influential to large numbers of people. Denver's advocacy made large numbers of people aware of the issues surrounding conservation and animal welfare.

     
DeVos, Helen
Helen DeVos, wife of Amway entrepreneur Rich DeVos, is an important Grand Rapids philanthropist who has made significant financial gifts in the musical arts and children's health. More >>

Helen DeVos's love of classical music led her to contribute significantly, along with her husband, Rich DeVos, to the Grand Rapids symphony and to the development of the DeVos Performance Hall that opened in 1980. Because of Helen's love for children, she gave a major gift toward programs for women and children at Butterworth Hospital. As a result, the Helen DeVos Women and Children's Medical Center was named for her.

Women's Perspective   'Everyday' Philanthropist
DeVos, Richard M.
Richard DeVos, co-founder of Amway, made significant contributions to the revitalization of downtown Grand Rapids, Michigan. More >>

Along with his partner, Jay Van Andel, Rich DeVos founded Amway in 1959. After establishing his wealth, DeVos made major investments in downtown revitalization. He also supported education and the arts, including the Grand Rapids Symphony through his philanthropy.

    'Everyday' Philanthropist
Diamond, Irene: A Diamond in the Rough
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During her lifetime, Diamond (1911-2003) contributed 90 percent of everything that she had as personal wealth to foundations and organizations that were close to her heart. She gave in several areas but most predominantly to the arts, medical research (AIDS) and human rights.

Women's Perspective    
Diana, Princess of Wales
Diana Spencer or Princess Diana and her tireless efforts on behalf of the sick and the poor. More >>

Diana Spencer (1961-1996) became Princess Diana in 1981 when she married Prince Charles of Wales. She was beloved partially because of her tireless efforts on behalf of the sick and the poor. At the time of her tragic death, she supported a cancer fund; a London children's hospital; the National AIDS Trust; a leprosy mission; the English National Ballet, and Centerpoint Soho (providing services to homeless youth). She raised public awareness worldwide for the ban on land mines. The Diana, Princess of Wales Memorial Fund was established in the U.K. and the U.S. in her memory.

Women's Perspective    
Dix, Dorothea
The life of Dorothea Dix as a champion for the mentally ill and the imprisoned. More >>

A social reformer dedicated to changing conditions for people who could not help themselves, Dorothea Dix was a champion for the mentally ill and the imprisoned. Not only a crusader, she was also a teacher, author, lobbyist, and superintendent of nurses during the Civil War. Through her tireless work of over two decades, Dix instituted changes in the treatment and care of the mentally ill and improved prison conditions. Today, the results of her efforts can still be seen throughout the United States, Canada, and many European countries.

Women's Perspective    
Douglass, Frederick (Paper I)
Frederick Douglass, an influential activist for social justice in the United States and advocate for the abolition of slavery and elimination of discrimination. More >>

As an African American born during slavery, Frederick Douglass (1818-1895) was influential in the promotion of social justice in the United States. He advocated for the abolition of slavery and elimination of discrimination based on degrading cultural values. Douglass serves as an important figure in American history because he supported key philanthropic responsibilities such as reciprocity, mutual aid, and commitment to an ideal.

  African American Perspective  
Douglass, Frederick (Paper II)
Frederick Douglass was a leader in the abolitionist movement, a spokesperson for racial equality. Douglass is best known as a former slave turned anti-slavery leader and civil rights promoter. More >>

Douglas, an escaped slave, was a powerful orator and writer, protesting slavery and debating the theory of social adjustment for continuing slavery. He was the only man to take a prominent part in the proceedings of the equal rights for women convention, and was a featured speaker at celebrations of the ratification of the Fifteenth Amendment.

  African American Perspective  
Drexel, Saint Katharine
Saint Katharine Drexel and her work with the Sisters of the Blessed Sacrament for Negroes to educate and care for the welfare of Native and African Americans. More >>

Saint Katharine Drexel (1858-1955) began the Sisters of the Blessed Sacrament in the 1890s, a Catholic order committed to the education and welfare of Native and African Americans (and, today, to the people of Haiti). Mother Drexel devoted her life and immense fortune to this cause and, under her leadership, the sisters built, funded, supplied, and staffed over sixty schools and missions throughout America. One of these institutions is Xavier University in New Orleans, the first black coeducational Catholic institution of higher education in Louisiana. Mother Drexel was canonized by Pope John Paul II in January 2000, as the second native-born American saint.

Women's Perspective    
Du Bois, W.E.B.
A pioneer in black political thought, W.E.B. Du Bois was considered a central figure in the history of African-American politics. More >>

A pioneer in black political thought, W.E.B. Du Bois was considered a central figure in the history of African-American politics.

     
Duke, Doris
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An inheritor of a tremendous estate, Duke was an heiress and philanthropist of unparalleled status. Duke donated millions in controversial and progressive ways, including funds to support and educate southern black students, donations to the Birth Control League and also AIDS research.

Women's Perspective    
Eastman, George
A self-motivated inventor, entrepreneur and philanthropist, George Eastman revolutionized the photography and film industries while giving money away quietly and privately. More >>

A self-motivated inventor, entrepreneur, and philanthropist, George Eastman (1854-1932) revolutionized the photography and film industries. Eastman's importance to philanthropy is expansive. He provided contrast to the Rockefellers and Carnegies, the only other donors of his magnitude at that time. Where they endowed foundations and were very visible with their philanthropy, Eastman gave away all of his money personally and went to great pains to do so quietly and privately.

     
Edelman, Marian Wright
Marian Wright Edelman aided African Americans during the Civil Rights movement and helped bring visibility to the poor living conditions and starvation facing southern black children and families. More >>

Lawyer, social activist, and premier children's rights advocate in the United States, Marian Wright Edelman aided African Americans in the south during the Civil Rights movement as they asserted their right to vote. She also helped bring visibility to the poor living conditions and starvation facing southern black children and families. In 1973, she founded the Children's Defense Fund as the leading advocate for children's and families' rights. CDF and Edelman continue to bring focus to disparities in health care, education, and other social services, particularly for minority families and children.

Women's Perspective African American Perspective  
Feeney, Charles E.
Charles Feeney is an Irish-American businessman and philanthropist who secretly gave millions to charity. He earned his fortune through co-founding the airport gift shop Duty Free Shoppers, Ltd. More >>

Feeney earned him millions from his business but turned over his thirty-nine percent stake to a charitable foundation he created, Atlantic Philanthropies. The foundation concentrates their investments in programs for Ageing, Disadvantaged Children & Youth, Population Health, and Reconciliation & Human Rights.

    'Everyday' Philanthropist
Fernandez, Raul
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Ford, Henry
Henry Ford and his philanthropic legacy through the Ford Foundation, one of the first and largest foundations in the world. More >>

Henry Ford (1863-1947), inventor and businessman, founded the Ford Motor Company. He improved the efficiency and lowered the cost of motor vehicles with his Model A and Model T. Ford left his philanthropic legacy through the Ford Foundation, one of the first and largest foundations in the world. It has provided over $12 million in grants and loans in its program areas: asset building and community development; peace and social justice; and knowledge, creativity, and freedom.

     
Fossey, Dian
Dian Fossey was best known for her observations of the gorillas of the Virunga Mountains region of central Africa. She lived with and observed the mountain gorillas on and off for a period of nearly twenty years between 1966 and 1985. Fossey was murdered near her research facility in Rwanda in 1985, a case which remains unsolved. More >>

Committed to making a difference, Dian Fossey's academic work with the mountain gorillas was very important, but her personal commitment to the gorillas and her advocacy of the value of these creatures will be her legacy.

Women's Perspective    
Fox, Thomas
Thomas Fox is a third-generation jewelry store owner who donated innovative robotic technology to three local hospitals. More >>

Fox felt compelled to give back to the community that made his jewelry business such a success. His philanthropy has enabled Grand Rapids hospitals to enter a new era of robotic technology. He supported many other nonprofit organizations through financial gifts and volunteering, including the Red Cross and Hospice.

    'Everyday' Philanthropist
Franklin, Benjamin
An overview of Ben Franklin's contributions that changed the landscape of the United States' political, international, educational and social life. More >>

A profoundly influential American, Ben Franklin's contributions changed the beginnings and future landscape of the United States' political, international, educational, and social life. A true Renaissance man, his roles included philanthropist, writer, printer, editor, free-thinker, inventor and diplomat. Franklin's best talents lay in his ability to persuade different groups of people to join together for benevolent purposes.

     
Friedan, Betty
Betty Friedan, woman philanthropist who launched the second wave of the American women's movement in 1963 with her book The Feminine Mystique. More >>

Betty Friedan (1921- ) launched the second wave of the American women's movement in 1963 with her book The Feminine Mystique, which revealed the isolation and dissatisfaction many middle class women felt in their roles as housewives. Friedan was a founder of the National Organization for Women (NOW) and served as its president. She lobbied for the passage of the Equal Rights Amendment, calling for equal protection for men and women under the Constitution. The ERA was not passed. In 1971, she helped found the National Women's Political Caucus.

Women's Perspective    
Gallaudet, Thomas Hopkins
An overview of Thomas Hopkins Gallaudet and his work with deaf children and adults. More >>

Thomas Hopkins Gallaudet (1787-1851) was a trained minister whose future changed when he met Alice Cogswell, a young deaf mute girl. In 1817, Gallaudet opened the Connecticut Asylum for the Education and Instruction of Deaf and Dumb Persons in Hartford, Connecticut; it was the first U.S. deaf school. He had observed European educational methods and recruited a teacher of the deaf, Laurent Clerc, whose work helped develop American Sign Language (ASL).

     
Garcia, Dr. Hector Perez
An overview of Dr. Hector Perez Garcia, an advocate for Hispanic-American rights during the Chicano movement. More >>

Dr. Hector Perez Garcia (1914-1996) was an advocate for Hispanic-American rights during the Chicano movement. He was the first Mexican-American member of the U.S. Civil Rights Commission and was awarded the Medal of Freedom. In 1948, he founded the American GI Forum in Corpus Christi, Texas, to assist veterans and their families with educational, health, employment, and civil rights issues. Today, the forum has 150,000 members and chapters in a number of states.

     
Gates, William H., III (Bill Gates)
William Henry Gates III and his foundation's focus on global health and population control programs, increased library technology, minority scholarships, and education reform. More >>

William Henry Gates III (1955- ) earned his tremendous wealth as software engineer, co-founder (with friend Paul Allen) and chief executive officer of Microsoft (one of the largest technology corporations). Making a tremendous impact on philanthropy, Gates and his wife have given $24 billion to the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The foundation's focus includes global health and population control programs, increased library technology, minority scholarships, and education reform. It has had tremendous impact on AIDS in Africa, and health care and immunizations in developing countries.

     
Gilman, Charlotte Perkins
During her lifetime, Charlotte Perkins Gilman worked to promote woman suffrage, the professionalization of domestic work, and the social purity movement. More >>

Charlotte Perkins Gilman (1860-1935) was a lecturer, suffragist, and prolific writer of both fiction and non-fiction. Her groundbreaking work, Women and Economics: A Study of the Economic Relation between Men and Women as a Factor in Social Evolution (1898), brought her international acclaim. Today, she is best known for a short story "The Yellow Wallpaper." During her lifetime, Gilman worked to promote woman suffrage, the professionalization of domestic work, and the social purity movement (which sought to abolish prostitution and establish a common "age of consent".

     
Goizueta, Roberto Crispulo
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Coca-Cola Company Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Goizueta was a believer in "strategic philanthropy." During his tenure as leader of the company Coca-Cola saw new products, widely publicized corporate sponsorships, new marketing ventures, and an established a foundation from Goizueta's personal wealth with an endowment of $38 million.

     
Goodall, Jane
Jane Goodall was the first of several people recruited by Louis Leakey to do extensive studies of primate behavior. She is credited with many original observations, including tool making and use by the chimpanzees, meat eating, and warfare between chimpanzee groups. More >>

Jane Goodall's commitment to primate research and the cause of animal welfare have helped her in developing techniques and making discoveries that changed the perceptions of everyone about these creatures.

Women's Perspective    
Grandin, Temple
Temple Grandin is one of the leading authorities on the design of animal handling facilities. Grandin suffers from autism; a condition which she believes helps her to think or perceive more like an animal than a "normal" human, and has led to her insights concerning animal behavior. More >>

Temple Grandin's work in designing safe, humane animal handling systems for meat processors has eliminated a great deal of inhumane treatment of animals. Her argument that animals are not things because they can feel pain and fear makes an important moral distinction that demands that humans respect the right of animals to be free of fear and pain inflicted by humans.

Women's Perspective    
Guggenheim Family (The)
Earning millions in the smelting industry, the Guggenheims are widely-known philanthropists who have created a series of foundations. More >>

The family has created a legacy by funding the development of foundations, schools, the creation of museums, art collections, innovations in science, aeronautics, and the advancement of critical thought.They have been an example of influencing culture thorough philanthropic contributions.

     
Hamersma, June
June Hamersma is the founder of the Hospice of Michigan Foundation and served as director of the January Series at Calvin College for twenty years. More >>

In addition to her significant contribution to the intellectual life of Grand Rapids, June Hamersma volunteered thousands of hours for Hospice and Michigan hospital guilds that raise money to support the hospital.

Women's Perspective   'Everyday' Philanthropist
Hauenstein, Ralph W.
Ralph Hauenstein had a distinguished military career, including work with the CCC and CIA. His philanthropy contributed greatly to West Michigan education and health institutions. More >>

Hauenstein was assigned to the Civilian Conservation Corps in 1935 and eventually became chief of intelligence for the European Theater of Operations in World War II. He attained the rank of Colonel and worked on the staff of General Dwight Eisenhower. He is the philanthropist responsible for the Ralph W. Hauenstein Center for Presidential Studies at Grand Valley State University, the Hauenstein Neurosciences Center at Saint Mary's Health Care, and the Grace Hauenstein Library at Aquinas College. He has also supported the Guardian Angels Home, the Salvation Army, the renovation of Civic Theatre, and many other local causes.

    'Everyday' Philanthropist
Haviland, Laura Smith
A summary of the contributions of Laura Smith Haviland, a pioneer social activist who devoted her life to others. More >>

Laura Smith Haviland's entire life is a tie to the philanthropic sector. She worked tirelessly as a volunteer in helping slaves obtain freedom, educating and caring for former slaves and orphans. Laura is a prime example of selfless love given to others over a lifetime.

Women's Perspective African American Perspective  
Hearst, Phoebe
Phoebe Apperson Hearst as a generous donor to the University of California at Berkeley and the first woman to serve on the Board of Regents. More >>

Phoebe Apperson Hearst (1842-1919) was a generous donor to the University of California at Berkeley and the first woman to serve on the Board of Regents. Hearst (wife of self-made millionnaire land-owner and rancher George Hearst, 1820-1891) provided her influence and financial support to establish women's scholarships, facilities, and faculty, and to promote the intellectual and social development of Berkeley's female students. She also funded several large-scale archeological expeditions and architectural contests.

     
Helms, Edgar J.
Reverend Edgar James Helms work as a philanthropist and founder of Goodwill Industries. More >>

Reverend Edgar James Helms (1863-1942) founded settlement houses in Boston to help residents of its poorest and most crime-ridden neighborhood. He began a system of collecting used items from the wealthy and repairing them for resale to the poor at Morgan Hill Chapel (later called Morgan Memorial Co-operative Industries and Stores). It was incorporated in 1905 and became Goodwill Industries. Today, the international organization provides resale stores, employment training, and other services for the poor, immigrants and the disabled.

     
Hogg, Ima
Civic leader, art collector, musician, and philanthropist, Ima Hogg's interests and passions for minority issues, mental health, education and historical preservation. More >>

Civic leader, art collector, musician, and philanthropist, Ima Hogg's interests and passions included music, art, antiques, minority issues, mental health, education, and historical preservation. Her passion and dedication to these diverse interests in her home state of Texas, particularly in the city of Houston, made her one of the most respected and admired women in Texas history.

Women's Perspective    
Holton, Earl and Donnalee
Earl Holton was president of Meijer, Inc. of West Michigan from 1980 to 1998. With his wife, Donnalee, Mr. Holton was a major contributor and volunteer for Grand Rapids health institutions. More >>

Earl Holton held a long career at Meijer, which gave him and Donnalee the means to become major philanthropists. Their extensive volunteer careers through Butterworth Hospital guilds gave the Holtons the interest in supporting Grand Rapids medical institutions, such as the DeVos Children's Hospital. Their leadership has inspired many others to increase their philanthropy.

Women's Perspective   'Everyday' Philanthropist
Hooker, Robert and Judy
Robert Hooker was extensively involved in revitalization of downtown Grand Rapids, Michigan. Robert and Judy actively support the symphony and Grand Valley State University. More >>

Robert and Judy Hooker have served at a variety of Grand Rapids nonprofit and charity organizations. Robert Hooker played a leading community-building role in Grand Rapids through Grand Action, and Judy made major contributions to local and state foundations. Both have volunteered extensively in the community and supported Grand Valley State University and the symphony.

Women's Perspective   'Everyday' Philanthropist
Hoover, Herbert
Herbert Clark Hoover was the 31st United States President. His acts of philanthropy ranged from monetary donations to volunteerism. Hoover donated his entire presidential salary to charity. More >>

Hoover is known for being elected president by one of the biggest majorities in the history of the Republican Party. Hoover's administration worked for legislation to protect children, to help small businesses and homeowners, and legislation for the reform of criminals. For his last 50 years of service he did not accept any payment for his work.

     
Howe, Dr. Samuel Gridley
Samual Gridley Howe is best remembered as an educational innovator for the blind and deaf, a reformer for the treatment of the mentally ill and an advocate for the integration of blacks during and after the Civil War. More >>

Best remembered as an educational innovator for the blind and deaf; a reformer for the humane treatment of the mentally ill, and an advocate for the integration of blacks during and after the Civil War, Samuel Gridley Howe (1801-1876) pursued philanthropic causes throughout his lifetime.

     
Huerta, Delores
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As co-founder of the National Farm Workers Association, Huerta is a role model for Mexican American women and is considered the most predominant Chicana labor leader in the United States. For more than thirty years she has dedicated her life to the fight for justice for migrant farm workers through her work as an activist, lobbyist and advocate.

Women's Perspective    
Hunting, John
John Hunting's father was one of the founders of Steelcase in Grand Rapids, Michigan. John established the Dyer-Ives Foundation and works with other foundations, especially related to environmental conservation. More >>

John is a member of the third generation of the Hunting family that is successful and influential in the furniture industry and philanthropy in Grand Rapids. The Hunting family gave the lead gift in honor of David Hunting, Sr. for the downtown Grand Rapids YMCA that opened in July 2005.

    'Everyday' Philanthropist
Jefferson, Thomas
Thomas Jefferson, the third President of the United States, will be remembered as the defender of democracy and advocate for the common people. More >>

Jefferson was able to hold many political offices during his lifetime including governor of Virginia, U.S. minister to France, Secretary of State under George Washington, vice-president under John Adams, and as the third President of the United States. Jefferson wanted to be remembered as the "author of the Declaration of American Independence, of the Statute of Virginia for religious freedom, and Father of the University of Virginia".

     
Johnson, Lady Bird
Lady Bird Johnson significantly contributed to society as America's First Lady to Lyndon B. Johnson. She is most noted for her beautification of the American landscape and efforts to mask landfills. More >>

Lady Bird's beautification efforts included implementation of wildflowers, the reduction of billboards on state highways, the preservation of national parks, and the restoration of inner city playgrounds. Furthermore, the presence of Lady Bird in the White House encouraged female activists as she spoke at many conferences for women across the states and luncheons at the White House.

Women's Perspective    
Johnston, Velma B.
Velma Bronn Johnston was largely responsible for ensuring the survival of herds of wild horses and burros in the American west. Her work also led to some of the environmental legislation that helps to protect public lands. More >>

Velma Johnson's advocacy for wild horses and burros resulted in legislation that protected both the animals and the habitat in which they live. Her single minded pursuit of humane treatment of animals who could not defend themselves is an example of how an individual can have an impact on the larger society.

Women's Perspective    
Keeler, Mary Ann
Mary Ann Keeler was a leader in downtown revitalization and promotion of public art. More >>

Mary Ann was active in downtown revitalization and was a leader in bringing the Ford Museum and Grand Center downtown. She invested heavily in the performing arts, museums, and libraries. She has been especially committed to bringing sculptures to public places in Grand Rapids so citizens can learn about the art of today while they go about their lives.

Women's Perspective   'Everyday' Philanthropist
Keller, Fred P.
Fred Keller is the founder and owner of Cascade Engineering and a significant leader in the realm of social, economic, and environmental sustainability. More >>

Fred Keller is the founder and owner of Cascade Engineering. He serves as a director of Meijer, the chairman of the Economic Club of Grand Rapids, the chairman of the School to Career Progressions Board and the W.K. Kellogg Foundation. He is also on the advisory team for the Delta Strategy, a community-effectiveness organization. He and his wife support the Grand Rapids Symphony.

    'Everyday' Philanthropist
Kellogg, Will Keith (W.K.)
The philanthropic history of W.K. Kellogg, founder of a global cereal industry and the W.K. Kellogg Foundation. More >>

After inventing wheat flakes, W.K. Kellogg spent his last forty-five years as the captain of a global cereal industry and one of the world's largest philanthropists. His work is continued today under the auspices of the W.K. Kellogg Foundation.

     
Kersee, Jackie Joyner
Jackie Joyner-Kersee, one of the world's greatest female athletes, is a philanthropist who has dedicated her life to the development of young people. More >>

Jackie Joyner-Kersee (1962- ), one of the world's greatest female athletes, won three gold, one silver and two bronze medals over four consecutive Olympic games. She was a heptathlete who holds the world record at 7,291 points and Olympic and national records in the long jump. As a philanthropist, she is dedicated to the development of young people. She established the Jackie Joyner-Kersee Community Foundation, the Jackie Joyner-Kersee Youth Center Foundation, and the Jackie Joyner-Kersee Boys & Girls Club in her hometown of East St. Louis, Illinois.

Women's Perspective African American Perspective  
King, Martin Luther, Jr.
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King came of age during a time when Jim Crow laws reigned supreme, a time when "separate but equal" was the accepted doctrine. Unlike other prominent American heroes, King was a regular citizen who rose to glory during his career as a minister, seeking to teach Americans that our nation's true identity lay not in color and hate but in diversity and love.

  African American Perspective  
Kroc, Joan
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During her life Mrs. Kroc had given away more than one billion dollars towards causes ranging from animal welfare, children's charities, homelessness, nuclear disarmament, and the arts. Her generosity affected thousands of individuals, and many of her monetary gifts were make in privacy.

Women's Perspective    
La Russa, Tony
Tony La Russa is one of the best major baseball managers, one of only two to win National Championships in both the National League and the American League. His passion for baseball is matched by his love for animals, and the desire to provide a sanctuary for stray and lost pets through his Animal Rescue Foundation (ARF). More >>

Tony La Russa and his wife Elaine are a high profile example of the kind of animal welfare advocacy that is encouraged by the ASPCA. The La Russa's have contributed time, money and celebrity to the cause.

     
Lathrop, Julia
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Lathrop was an advocate for the mentally ill, immigrants, equal rights for women, social reform and child welfare. Spending over two decades at Chicago's Hull House, she worked closely with Jane Adams and Ellen Gates Star. Lathrop was a pivotal agent in the reformation of the juvenile judicial system, among other areas of human rights.

Women's Perspective    
Lemmen, Harvey
Harvey Lemmen worked for Meijer, Inc. for thirty-eight years. After retiring, he spent hundreds of thousands of hours volunteering for the Red Cross. More >>

Harvey Lemmen was an executive at Meijer, Inc. and made a major contribution as a volunteer driver for the Red Cross. He gave to Grand Valley State University an important collection of Abraham Lincoln and Civil War books and artifacts, and donated money to Grand Rapids Public Library, the Spectrum Health Foundation, Planned Parenthood, and the Grand Rapids Community Foundation.

    'Everyday' Philanthropist
Leopold, Aldo (Paper I)
Aldo Leopold is considered the father of wildlife management and of the United States wilderness preservation system. He was not only a forester, and a conservationist, but he was also a philosopher, and a writer. More >>

Leopold worked for the U.S. Forest Service much of his life and well known for his collection of essays, which defined a new relationship between people and nature. The organization he co-founded, The Wilderness Society, works to protect wild places and was influential in Congress's creation of the Wilderness Act in 1964.

     
Leopold, Aldo (Paper II)
Aldo Leopold, renowned environmentalist, is considered the father of Wildlife Management. One of the founders of the Wilderness Society, he generated the environmental movement and even inspired the first Earth Day. More >>

Leopold argued that using wilderness for economic gain did not attribute to progress in civilization and that remaining wilderness should be reserved for parks and outdoor life. He argued that wild country was essential to everyone's happiness and that the opportunity of finding such land was disappearing quickly.

     
Lettinga, Wilbur (Bill), Sr.
Bill Lettinga owned the accounting firm Lettinga & Associates. He donated generously to the Hope Network and Butterworth Hospital. More >>

Bill Lettinga initiated the Hope Network Foundation in 1987. The Coral Lettinga Campus at Hope Network is named for Lettinga's granddaughter. He was a founding member of the Butterworth Foundation board. He donated the funds that made the Lettinga Cancer Center possible.

    'Everyday' Philanthropist
Lilly , Eli
A pre-eminent leader in civic responsibility and philanthropy, Eli Lilly, is the founder of one of the world's largest private foundations. More >>

A pre-eminent leader in civic responsibility and philanthropy, Eli Lilly (1885-1977) inherited and made his own fortune through the family pharmaceutical company. As a founder of the Lilly Endowment, one of the world's largest private foundations, he supported educational endeavors, religion, and community service. Much of his philanthropy assisted nonprofit organizations and programs in his hometown of Indianapolis or his home state of Indiana.

     
Low, Juliette Gordon
An historical and philanthropic overview of Juliette Gordon Low, founder of Girl Scouts of the USA. More >>

Best known as the founder of Girl Scouts of the USA, Juliette Gordon Low outgrew the trappings of an upper-class society life to create an organization for young women that integrated leadership, equality for all, self-confidence, responsibility, integrity, decision-making, teamwork, outdoor skills, and philanthropy. Girl Scouts of the USA continues, today, to enable girls to grow into responsible, caring, independent citizens.

Women's Perspective    
Lowell, Josephine Shaw
Josephine Lowell's philanthropic work of improving women's correctional facilities, institutions for the mentally ill and poorhouses for children. More >>

American social reformer, advocate, and charity worker of the late 1800s, Josephine Lowell believed in being a charity worker and that charity should change the recipients, as well as relieve their suffering. Her work centered on improving circumstances in women's correctional facilities and institutions for the mentally ill as well as being an advocate for children who were being placed in poorhouses.

Women's Perspective    
Lubbers, Arend Donselaar (Don)
Don Lubbers was the president of Grand Valley State University for over thirty years. More >>

Don Lubbers volunteered his time to many community organizations. His most notable contribution to the community, however, was the development of an excellent public university. The university provided West Michigan with widespread and profound benefits, including the public television station and a downtown campus that was a major boost to the central city revitalization. Don Lubbers Stadium at the university is named for him.

    'Everyday' Philanthropist
Maathai, Wangari
Wangari Muta Maathai, the 2004 winner of the Nobel Peace Prize, has become an international figure because of her persistence in the struggle for democracy, human rights and environmental conservation. More >>

Maathai is best known for her efforts to develop the Green Belt Movement, a grassroots organization that focuses on planting trees to replenish the environment and improve the quality of life. But Maathai's involvement in the philanthropic sector reaches far beyond the establishment of the Green Belt Movement; she is also active in many other beneficial organizations.

Women's Perspective    
Marquette, Father
Father Jacques Marquette was a Jesuit priest sent to Canada and the US Midwest to convert Indians to Christianity. He and Louis Jolliet were of the first to explore the Midwest US and the Mississippi River. More >>

The travel partners established outposts while on their journey and many still stand today. His work is honored with a statue in the US Capital and a National Memorial in St. Ignace Michigan.

    'Everyday' Philanthropist
Martindill, William
Martindill was a longtime successful business owner in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Through his church, he helped develop Porter Hills Retirement Community. More >>

William Martindill was an active philanthropist and volunteer in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Through his church, Westminster Presbyterian, he developed and served on the board of Porter Hills Retirement Community. Martindill was also the main fundraiser for the SOUL of Philanthropy group that conducted interviews with key West Michigan figures in order to gain and share knowledge about philanthropy in Grand Rapids.

    'Everyday' Philanthropist
Mawby, Dr. Russell G.
A paper summarizing the stewardship and leadership of Dr. Russell G. Mawby, lifelong philanthropist and the Chairman and CEO Emeritus of the W.K. Kellogg Foundation. More >>

Russell G. Mawby has earned a global reputation as a thoughtful and visionary leader of the W.K. Kellogg Foundation.

     
McCarty, Oseola
After 70 years of hard work and saving as a laundress, Oseola McCarty made a gift of $150,000 to the University of Southern Mississippi to help needy students. More >>

After 70 years of hard work and saving as a laundress, this inspirational woman made a gift of $150,000 to the University of Southern Mississippi to help needy students.

Women's Perspective African American Perspective  
Meijer, Fred and Lena
Fred and Lena Meijer are second-generation owners of the successful supermarket chain Meijer. The couple has given generously to the community, especially related to health and the environment. More >>

The owners of a major supermarket chain, Fred and Lena Meijer made significant contributions to the community through the business and through their philanthropy. Their philanthropic gifts include Frederik Meijer Gardens and Sculpture Park, the Meijer Heart Center, the Meijer Trails Network, the Lemmen-Holton Cancer Center, and the Meijer Majestic Theatre.

Women's Perspective   'Everyday' Philanthropist
Mellon, Andrew W.
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A brilliant businessman and philanthropist, Mellon's influence in American society was felt in the areas of business innovation and financial investment, government policy, and philanthropy in education, business research, and the arts. His efforts in the sector helped to further shape not only the means but also the generosity of large donors.

     
Mellon, Paul
An historical overview of philanthropist Paul Mellon, an individual who donated nearly $1 billion in support of the fine arts. More >>

Paul Mellon (1907-1999) was a wealthy philanthropist who donated nearly $1 billion in support of the fine arts. He and his father, banker/industrialist Andrew W. Mellon, built the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. Paul and wife "Bunny"? donated their collections and made bequests to The National Gallery of Art, the Yale Center for British Art, and the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts. His collection of rare historical books and manuscripts, including original American historical documents like an 1814 Lewis and Clark journal, made his contributions personal.

     
Montessori, Maria
Maria Montessori is one of the most innovative childhood pedagogues of the 20th century. An early feminist and advocate of women's rights, she gave birth to a pioneering method of childhood education. More >>

Montessori initiated a worldwide educational movement that is still very much alive and well today. This movement has given input to the creation of a wealth of nonprofit entities and associations and coalitions of Montessorians at the international, national, regional, and local levels.

Women's Perspective African American Perspective 'Everyday' Philanthropist
Morino, Mario
An philanthropic overview of Mario M. Morino, a pioneer of venture philanthropy. More >>

Mario M. Morino is a pioneer of venture philanthropy, a form of charitable giving modeled after venture capitalism. He was an entrepreneur in the computer software industry who founded the Morino Institute to explore and promote ways for the Internet and the Internet-driven economy to advance positive social change. Morino launched Venture Philanthropy Partners that seeks to benefit children from low-income neighborhoods by strengthening the nonprofits that serve them. He has been the driving force behind the YouthLearn Initiative, Netpreneur, and Potomac Knowledgeway.

     
Mother Teresa
The philanthropic work of Mother Teresa, the Macedonian woman who chose to serve India's "poorest of the poor and live among them and like them." More >>

The Macedonian woman who chose to serve India's "poorest of the poor and live among them and like them."

Women's Perspective    
Mott, John R.
John R. Mott as a philanthropist and leader in promoting the Christian ideals of peace and tolerance between nations. More >>

John R. Mott first became involved in world service through the YMCA and served in many leadership roles for the organization including president of the YMCA's World Alliance from 1926-37. Throughout his life, Mott created worldwide organizations that have united millions of young people in work promoting the Christian ideals of peace and tolerance between nations. Predominately working with youth, he believed that they possessed the key to the future.

     
Muir, John (Paper I)
The work of John Muir, father of the United States National Park system and founder of one of the country's largest environmental advocacy groups, the Sierra Club. More >>

Father of the United States National Park system and founder of one of the country's largest environmental advocacy groups, the Sierra Club, John Muir is commonly credited for initiating the modern Conservation movement. Through his famous writings, lobbying efforts, and western treks, Muir helped many begin to understand the importance of forest and land conservation in America.

     
Muir, John (Paper II)
John Muir is credited, along with Theodore Roosevelt, as being the father of our national parks system. He was also one of the founders of the Sierra Club, one of the largest conservation advocacy groups in the United States. More >>

John Muir's work and writing educated influential Americans about the value of the remaining wilderness in the country and the need to protect and preserve them. His emphasis on ecosystems has resulted in widespread interest and support for environmental protection and protection of endangered species.

     
Newman, Paul
An overview of Paul Newman and his corporate philanthropy and corporate social responsibility initiatives. More >>

Paul Newman (1925 - ) is a well-known film and theatre actor. He and friend A.E. Hotchner began a company to sell Newman's Own Salad Dressing. Now Newman's Own sells a whole line of products. The company has given away nearly $150 million with a remarkable policy of donating 100% of its proceeds to charity. These donations helped to found and support camps, belonging to the Association of Hole in the Wall Camps, for children suffering from illnesses throughout the U.S. and Europe. Newman also founded the Committee to Encourage Corporate Philanthropy.

     
Newman, Ryan
Ryan Newman has been one of NASCAR's top ranked drivers. He also has had a love of dogs since childhood. Ryan and his wife Krissie founded the Ryan Foundation in 2005 to be effective advocates for the humane treatment of animals. More >>

Ryan Newman's importance to animal welfare is found in the mission statement of his foundation which states, "...to educate and encourage people to spay/neuter their pets and to adopt dogs and cats from animal shelters...". He and his wife have made a significant commitment to the subject of animal welfare.

     
Packard, David and Lucile
A philanthropic overview of David and Lucile Packard, founders of one of the largest foundations in the world. More >>

Best known for their philanthropic work through the David and Lucile Packard Foundation, one of the largest not-for-profit philanthropies in the world, David Packard is recognized as the original co-founder of the electronics and technology company Hewlett-Packard, and Lucile Packard is most widely known for her work with the Stanford Convalescent Home, called today the Lucile Packard Children's Hospital.

     
Ralph Nader: Ally of the American Citizen-Consumer
The philanthropic work of consumer advocate, Ralph Nader, his controversial work increasing the accountability of "big business" and inspiring change through collective action. More >>

Ralph Nader is the best known consumer advocate of the 20th century. Nader is a tireless and single-minded organizer and activist. In addition to increasing the accountability of carmakers to the American people, his work over the past forty years has improved the quality of life for Americans in areas as diverse as the environment, healthcare, insurance, and pension and disability rights. Through his efforts, consumers now realize their own power as social activists to make change through collective action.

     
Richmond, Mary Ellen
Pioneer of professional social work and an integral part of women's history in the United States, a review of Mary Ellen Richmond's work with families and their social problems. More >>

Pioneer of professional social work and an integral part of women's history in the United States, Mary Ellen Richmond's work with families and their social problems, as well as her research, provided valuable insight into how charity evolved into social work. She successfully created a model for social casework (also known as case management) and the approach now known in the social work field as person-in-environment perspective.

Women's Perspective    
Robinson, Jacob and Delores
The Robinsons volunteer significantly for programs for young children in their community. They also contribute financially to the Grand Rapids Community Foundation in Grand Rapids, Michigan. More >>

The Robinsons are educators with modest incomes who find the time to share their talent and make a plan of giving that is a benefit to others. They made charitable giving a part of their budget each year. They are active in many organizations that build community, especially those related to education of children.

Women's Perspective African American Perspective 'Everyday' Philanthropist
Roosevelt, Theodore
An brief historical overview of Theodore Roosevelt, the twenty-sixth U.S. President who believed the Panama Canal would benefit the U.S. and enacted many laws and regulations for environmental policy. More >>

Theodore Roosevelt (1858-1919), the twenty-sixth U.S. President, was a progressive Republican who rose to power as a war hero""his Rough Riders won the battle at San Juan Hill, a turning point in the Spanish-American War. He believed the Panama Canal would benefit the U.S. He enacted many laws and regulations for his environmental conservation policy, protecting over 230 million acres of wilderness. Roosevelt's anti-trust policy allowed the break up of large business monopolies and enforced existing regulatory laws such as the Sherman Anti-Trust Act. He passed the Pure Food and Drug Act to regulate the food industry.

     
Rosenwald, Julius
Through his practice of philanthropy, Julius Rosenwald utilized his fame and fortune for the benefit of humankind. More >>

Through his practice of philanthropy, Julius Rosenwald (1862-1932) utilized his fame and fortune for the benefit of humankind. Rosenwald's career culminated in his presidency of Sears, Roebuck and Company. He used his fortune to create programs targeting the inequality and education of Jewish and African-American populations. His creation of the Julius Rosenwald Fund as a self-expiring entity, ending in the term of his life, raised interesting questions for philanthropy.

     
Royce, Stella and Charles
The Royces owned a successful Grand Rapids, Michigan business and were avid supporters of the arts. More >>

The Royces were frequent donors to almost all Grand Rapids arts organizations. They gave money and volunteered their time at the St. Cecilia Music Society, the Grand Rapids Symphony, the Grand Rapids Ballet, Opera Grand Rapids, the Urban Institute for Contemporary Arts, the Grand Rapids Civic Theatre, and the Grand Rapids Art Museum. Royce Auditorium at St. Cecilia Music Society was named for them in 1986.

Women's Perspective   'Everyday' Philanthropist
Rush, Benjamin
The "Father of American Psychiatry", Benjamin Rush signed the Declaration of Independence in 1776 and was actively involved charitable and activist organizations. More >>

Named the "Father of American Psychiatry" by the American Psychiatry Association, Benjamin Rush was born in 1745 and spent his life in an avid pursuit of knowledge. Diverse and talented, he signed the Declaration of Independence in 1776, became a member of the Continental Congress and discovered the cure for yellow fever, and was actively involved charitable and activist organizations.

     
Sage, Margaret Slocum
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Receiving a vast fortune after the passing of her husband, Mrs. Sage became a benefactor to every imaginable charity, from educational, religious and medical institutions to cultural preservation programs and animal shelters. At a time when men held social power and controlled American wealth, Sage became an example of a woman in control of her fortune and aware of her potential influence.

Women's Perspective    
Sanger, Margaret
Margaret Sanger's legacy and philanthropic work with the Planned Parenthood Federation of America and birth-control movement. More >>

Though some regard her savior, others a devil, Margaret Sanger's legacy has given women all over the world control in determining their fertility. Sanger was a public health nurse in the ghettos of New York City in the early twentieth century. Through her personal leadership and the founding of the Planned Parenthood Federation of America, Sanger initiated the modern birth-control movement.

Women's Perspective    
Schad, Vernis
Vernis Schad was a spokesperson for gender equality and became very active in supporting organizations that empower women in Grand Rapids, Michigan. More >>

Vernis Schad volunteered in her son's schools and eventually became president of the Parent-Teacher Association. She supported organizations that worked for women's rights and worked to make the schools more racially integrated.

Women's Perspective   'Everyday' Philanthropist
Secchia, Peter
Peter Secchia was a successful business owner who found many ways to give back to his community, including political service and an annual Thanksgiving dinner for less fortunate families in Grand Rapids, Michigan. More >>

Mr. Secchia was active in downtown Grand Rapids revitalization. He led an initiative to convert a former gravel-mining pit into the Millennium Park recreation area, and he gave significant gifts to Michigan State University.

    'Everyday' Philanthropist
Seton, Elizabeth Ann Bayley (Saint)
The life of Elizabeth Ann Seton, serving the needy and providing education for all by founding the Sisters of Charity in Baltimore in 1809. More >>

A devout Catholic, Elizabeth Ann Bayley Seton chose a life devoted to serving the needy and providing education for all by founding the Sisters of Charity in Baltimore in 1809. Her small group of Sisters moved to Emmitsburg, Maryland and opened St. Joseph Academy, providing an education for rural poor children. The original small group of five sisters grew to over fifty by 1821, the time of Mother Elizabeth Ann Seton's death. Mother Seton's greatest impact was in the growth of the Sisters of Charity that began during her lifetime and in the influence of her example which continues through today. From the work of these original Sisters and many others to follow, new community mission houses, hospitals and colleges grew throughout the United States and worldwide.

Women's Perspective    
Seton, Ernest Thompson
The philanthropic work of Ernest Seton Thomas, one of the original chairman of the committee that established the Boy Scouts of America. More >>

Naturalist, best-selling author, lecturer, and artist who studied wildlife and Native American culture, Ernest Seton Thomas is most widely known as chairman of the committee that established the Boy Scouts of America and as the founder of Woodcraft Indians. Seton also was deeply concerned with the future of the prairie, fighting strenuously to establish reservations for Native Americans and parks for animals threatened by extinction.

     
Shriver, Robert Sargent
Robert Sargent Shriver was an international lawyer and administrator, ambassador and an advocate for the poor and powerless. He was the first director of the Peace Corps. More >>

Committed to making the world a better place in which to live, and helping those most in need around the world and in our own country, Sargent Shriver has led a life of public service, compassion, and philanthropy in action.

    'Everyday' Philanthropist
Smith, Anna Harris
Anna Harris Smith, a devoted advocate for the kind and respectful treatment of animals and people, started the Animal Rescue League of Boston in 1989. The Animal Rescue League of Boston, to this day, remains firmly committed to the humane legacy of their founder. More >>

Anna Harris Smith wrote and lectured extensively on humane topics and was one of the most influential and respected humane leaders in her day. In addition to the dynamic leadership she provided in the field of animal welfare, Anna Harris Smith was also a pioneer in the promotion of humane education.

Women's Perspective    
Soros, George
George Soros has made vast sums of money by investing in global markets, and has committed to endowing numerous foundations which help in opening "closed societies" globally. More >>

Soros has demonstrated a strong commitment to spreading the democratic, liberal values of the open society, investing billions of his personal wealth in philanthropic projects advancing this viewpoint across the globe.

     
Spielberg, Steven
The work of Steven Spielberg, one of Hollywood's most successful film directors and Jewish philanthropist. More >>

Steven Spielberg (1946- ) is one of Hollywood's most influential and successful film directors and co-founder of DreamWorks SKG. Among his most popular and critically-acclaimed films are Jaws, E.T., The Color Purple, Raiders of the Lost Ark , and Jurassic Park ( Jaws was the first Hollywood blockbuster movie). After Schindler's List he founded the first organization focused on collecting historical testimonies and writings from Holocaust survivors " the Shoah Foundation. He has also used the profits of Schindler's List to grant money to Holocaust memorial efforts through his Righteous Persons Foundation.

     
Spira, Henry
Henry Spira was founder and early leader of Animal Rights International (ARI), an organization dedicated to protecting animals from inhumane treatment. More >>

Henry Spira and Animal Rights International were the first ever to win an animal rights confrontation with a large corporate opponent. Large numbers of animal rights organizations have since followed his lead, and the overall management of animals has become more humane as a result.

     
Sprague, William
Throughout his medical career, William Sprague traveled around the world to offer free medical services and contribute medical equipment and supplies to poor countries. More >>

William Sprague served in World War II and then became a doctor. Visiting over eighty countries as a volunteer, Dr. Sprague has spread medical equipment and supplies, knowledge and service literally throughout the world. In his travels, he has not avoided war-torn regions such as Darfur and Afghanistan. He vowed to eradicate polio and made major leaps towards that goal.

    'Everyday' Philanthropist
Stanton, Elizabeth Cady
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Stanton forever changed the social and political landscape of the United States of America by succeeding in her work to guarantee rights for women and slaves. Her unwavering dedication to women's suffrage resulted in the 19th amendment to the Constitution, which granted women the right to vote.

Women's Perspective    
Szold, Henrietta
An overview of the Jewish philanthropist, Henrietta Szold, critical to the Zionist movement and founder of Hadassah. Szold was a major force in healthcare and women's independence in the US and Palestine. More >>

A major force in the Zionist movement, in healthcare and in women's independence in the United States and in Palestine. She was the founder of the women's volunteer organization, Hadassah, which is one of the largest today. In addition, Ms. Szold was an accomplished scholar, editor, and Jewish thinker. Within the Youth Aliyah Movement, she was instrumental in bringing thousands of Jewish children from Germany to Palestine during World War II and integrating them into their new homeland.

Women's Perspective    
Terrell, Mary Eliza Church
The work of Mary Eliza Church Terrell a social activist and early feminist who advocated for women's suffrage and civil rights for African Americans. More >>

ocial activist and early feminist who advocated for women's suffrage and civil rights for African Americans. Born to free parents who had been newly emancipated from slavery, she became a formidable educator, lecturer and author. She is best known as the co-founder and first president of the National Association of Colored Women.

Women's Perspective    
Thoreau, Henry David
An historical overview of Henry David Thoreau, an American author, poet, natural philosopher and a leading figure in the Transcendentalist movement. More >>

Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) was an American author, poet, natural philosopher, and a leading figure in the Transcendentalist movement. His popular book, Walden (1854), was an autobiography depicting his experiences in the woods on Walden Pond in Massachusetts. Walden profoundly influenced environmental conservation and activism. Thoreau is also known for his famous essay, Civil Disobedience (1849), which later inspired world leaders such as Mahatma Gandhi and Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. with its passive resistance message.

     
Tomatis, Luis
Luis Tomatis was an influential heart doctor in Grand Rapids, Michigan who shaped the development of the world-class Van Andel Institute. More >>

Luis Tomatis was born in Argentina and married the famous artist and architect Gretchen Minnhaar. As a heart surgeon, Tomatis played a major role in furthering philanthropy toward medical causes in Grand Rapids. He also served on the board of the Grand Rapids Symphony, volunteered for the American Heart Association, and sent used medical products for the needy to Argentina.

    'Everyday' Philanthropist
Towne, Laura Matilda
Laura Matilda Towne was one of the first of her time to set up a school to educate freed slaves. Laura ran Penn School for 40 years and became a vital asset to the community. More >>

Towne's abolitionist ideas led her to an island near South Carolina where she and Ellen Murray started Penn School. Her background in homeopathic medicine allowed her to treat and befriend the freed slaves. Laura's example combats racism, and she started a legacy of respect and equality.

  African American Perspective 'Everyday' Philanthropist
Truth, Sojourner
The life of Sojourner Truth, African-American slave who later dedicated her life to fight for the rights of women. More >>

Born into slavery around 1797 in upstate New York, Isabella Baumfree was set free when slavery was abolished in New York State. Her newfound freedom was dedicated to a life of service to her people and to the rights of women. In later in life, Isabella would change her name to Sojourner Truth, a fitting name for an ex-slave who crusaded for abolition and women's rights.

Women's Perspective African American Perspective  
Tsuda, Umeko
The philanthropic work of Umeko Tsuda and the establishment of the American Scholarship for Japanese Women. More >>

Umeko Tsuda (1864-1929) founded Tsuda College (previously known as, Joshi Eigaku Juku and Tsuda Eigaku Juku), a Japanese women's college that introduced western-style education. Umeko's philanthropic activities included fundraising for Tsuda College and to establish the "American Scholarship for Japanese Women,"� a fund that allowed many women (later, Japan's educational and political leaders) to study in the U. S. Umeko was the first Japanese woman to study in the U. S. at her government's expense, living with Charles and Adeline Lanman, and later attending Bryn Mawr College.

Women's Perspective    
Tubman, Harriet
The story of Harriet Tubman and her escape from slavery, unyielding pursuit of freeing other slaves and battle for social reforms and justice for African-Americans. More >>

A second-generation slave who dedicated her life to fulfilling her cry to the slaveholders, "Let my people go!", Harriet Tubman escaped from slavery, herself, yet returned to the South nineteen times to free over three hundred slaves. She had an unflappable faith in God and believed slavery to be an evil created by man. Called "the Moses of her people," Tubman never lost a slave or failed on her missions. She was a scout and a spy for the Union Army during the Civil War and her information was responsible for the destruction of enormous amounts of Confederate resources. After the war, Tubman continued to battle for social reforms and justice for her people.

Women's Perspective African American Perspective  
Van Andel, David
David Van Andel is the son of preeminent Grand Rapids, Michigan, philanthropists Jay and Betty Van Andel. David is chairman and chief executive of the Van Andel Institute. He is co-owner of the Grand Rapids Griffins with Doug DeVos. More >>

David Van Andel's family made significant contributions to downtown revitalization and continued development. They are responsible for the renovation of the Amyway Grand Plaza Hotel in 1981. Betty served on the board of Opera Grand Rapids and supported Pine Rest Christian Hospital with the creation of the Van Andel Adolescent Center. The couple made the lead gift to the Van Andel Museum Center and the Van Andel Arena. They founded the Van Andel Institute in 2000.

    'Everyday' Philanthropist
Vega, Francisco
Francisco Vega was a successful business owner and advocate for Hispanic people in Grand Rapids, Michigan. More >>

Francisco Vega was an early and long-serving advocate for Hispanic people in Grand Rapids and West Michigan. He owned the Kent Memorial Gardens and founded several organizations that served the Hispanic community. He represented the voice of Hispanic Americans in his role as board member at the Kent County Department of Social Services. He was also involved in the development of Millennium Park recreational park.

    'Everyday' Philanthropist
Voss, Rev. B. Margaret
Margaret B. Voss graduated from seminary and became active in the community, organizing and promoting efforts that supported women and the elderly. More >>

As a woman ordained as a minister, Ms. Voss broke many barriers for women in the church and education. As an advocate for the rights of women and the elderly, Voss refused to accept limitations for herself. Dr. Voss served on the board of many organizations related to women, history, and the community.

Women's Perspective   'Everyday' Philanthropist
Walker, Madam C.J.
The story of Madam C.J. Walker and how she became an extremely successful businesswoman who assisted and contributed to numerous African American organizations and institutions. More >>

The first person in her family to be born free from slavery in 1867, Madam C.J. Walker became an extremely successful businesswoman who assisted and contributed to numerous African American organizations and institutions.

Women's Perspective    
Walker, Margaret Sellers
Margaret Sellers Walker broke many barriers as an African American woman in Grand Rapids, Michigan and led many community building efforts. More >>

Margaret Sellers Walker served as assistant city manager of Grand Rapids, Michigan, and as associate director of the Dorothy A. Johnson Center for Philanthropy & Nonprofit Leadership. She also served on boards and volunteered her time for a variety of community organizations, such as Dwelling Place, Blodgett Hospital, Delta Strategies, Hope Network, Inc., Clark Retirement Community, friends of Grand Rapids Community College, and the Grand Rapids Community Foundation.

Women's Perspective African American Perspective 'Everyday' Philanthropist
Walsh, John
John Walsh worked for the World Society for the Protection of Animals (WSPA) from 1961 to 2006. His work took him around the world rescuing animals. He and his team have saved thousands of animals from suffering and death in every corner of the globe. More >>

John Walsh is an example of the kind of person the animal welfare community really needs. He spent his career in the field actually delivering services to animals who needed them. In the process he took some extraordinary risks to his health and safety.

     
Washington, Booker T.
An historical and philanthropic overview of Booker T. Washington, founder of the Tuskegee Institute in Alabama. More >>

One of the most influential (and controversial) African Americans in history, Booker T. Washington (1856-1915) was raised the son of a slave mother. Self-motivated and committed to his own education from a young age, Washington took the first opportunity to attend a formal school, Hampton Institute, which led to professorship and the founding of one of the most prestigious African American educational institutions of the nineteenth century, Tuskegee Institute in Alabama. Washington was seen as accommodating the status quo of African American subordination because his writings and speeches advocated that success for blacks would be achieved through the economic stability of education (mainly, vocational training); he did not protest, did not challenge the political system and did not speak about the lack of social equality like his critics, Frederick Douglass and W.E.B. DuBois.

  African American Perspective  
Wege, Peter Melvin
The son of one of the Steelcase founders, Peter Wege is a significant philanthropist in Grand Rapids, Michigan. More >>

Peter Wege, the son of the founder of Steelcase, worked as a leader of the Grand Rapids, Michigan furniture company for nearly 40 years. Wege established the Wege Foundation and contributed to Aquinas College, St. Mary's Hospital, and the Grand Rapids Catholic Diocese. He is a major supporter of the arts and environmental issues. He funds nature trails and conservancies as well as efforts to protect the Great Lakes. He has provided fuel-efficient vehicles for organizations such as the Grand Rapids Police Department and gives to educational organizations that teach environmental responsibility.

    'Everyday' Philanthropist
Wells-Barnett, Ida B.
Ida B. Wells-Barnett's work as a writer and founder of a number of organizations, including the National Association of Colored Women and the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. More >>

Born into slavery in the South near the end of the Civil War. Ida B. Wells-Barnett saw the disparity in the rights of African Americans and whites and became an insightful and frequent writer on the topic, particularly on the horrifying practice of lynching. Even thoug she faced great tragedy, adversity, controversies and threats, she wrote and agitated for the betterment of her race with incredible energy and persistence. To this end, Ida helped to found a number of organizations, including the National Association of Colored Women and the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, the country's oldest civil rights organization. Wells-Barnett continued her "crusade for justice"? up until her death, at age sixty-nine.

Women's Perspective African American Perspective  
Winfrey, Oprah (Paper I)
An overview of Oprah Winfrey, her successful business ventures and philanthropic work for the community. More >>

Oprah Winfrey (1954- ) is the first black woman billionaire. Financial success enables her to "make an important difference in people's lives."? The Oprah Winfrey Foundation "support[s] the inspiration, empowerment and education of women, children, and families around the world,"? including building the Oprah Winfrey Leadership Academy for Girls in South Africa. Oprah's Angel Network raised over $12 million to provide scholarships to needy students, fund over 200 Habitat for Humanity homes, and build schools in ten countries. Winfrey's personal campaign for abused children resulted in "Oprah's Bill"? or the National Child Protection Act, a registry of child abusers. Oprah was the first black woman to host a nationally-syndicated television show, The Oprah Winfrey Show, and the first black woman to own a production company, Harpo Productions.

Women's Perspective    
Winfrey, Oprah (Paper II)
An historic overview of Oprah Winfrey and her philanthropic foundation and giving. More >>

Oprah Winfrey (1954- ) is the first black woman billionaire. Financial success enables her to "make an important difference in people's lives."? The Oprah Winfrey Foundation "support[s] the inspiration, empowerment and education of women, children, and families around the world,"? including building the Oprah Winfrey Leadership Academy for Girls in South Africa. Oprah's Angel Network raised over $12 million to provide scholarships to needy students, fund over 200 Habitat for Humanity homes, and build schools in ten countries. Winfrey's personal campaign for abused children resulted in "Oprah's Bill"? or the National Child Protection Act, a registry of child abusers. Oprah was the first black woman to host a nationally-syndicated television show, The Oprah Winfrey Show, and the first black woman to own a production company, Harpo Productions.

Women's Perspective    
Wondergem, Casey
As a public relations consultant for Amway, Casey Wondergem became involved in many philanthropic endeavors. He and his wife supported the symphony and opera. More >>

Casey Wondergem worked for Amway and directed the fundraising for the philanthropic endeavors of the Amway founders. Wondergem and his wife, Violet, were enthusiastic supporters of the opera and the symphony. The Wondergem Playground at Baxter Community Center was named for them in 1995 in honor of their contributions and Casey's help with their fundraising efforts.

    'Everyday' Philanthropist
Woodrick, Robert
Robert Woodrick, owner of a local grocery store chain, played a major role in battling racism in Grand Rapids, Michigan. More >>

Robert Woodrick founded the Institute for Healing Racism, which offers classes to explore issues of racism. He has also served on the board of the Lakeshore Ethnic Diversity Alliance. His wife, Aleicia, and daughter Georgia Woodrick were founders of the Grand Rapids Children's Museum.

    'Everyday' Philanthropist
Young, Richard
Richard Young owned a heating and cooling business and contributed time and money to community organizations, such as the YMCA and Blodgett Memorial Medical Center. More >>

Richard Young, an Eagle Scout, earned his juris doctor degree from the University of Michigan and served in the JAG Corps. He ran the family business and contributed generously of his time and money to the Salvation Army, United Way, and the arts in Grand Rapids, Michigan.

    'Everyday' Philanthropist