Learning to Give, Philanthropy education resources that teach giving and civic engagement

Promoting the Common Good
Lesson 4
print
Lesson
Handouts
Academic Standards
Philanthropy Framework

Purpose:

This lesson will emphasize the importance of voluntary action for the common welfare based upon student understanding of one's rights and the corresponding responsibility to protect them.

Duration:

Two Forty-Five Minute Class Periods

Objectives:

The learner will:

  • identify ways of fulfilling responsibilities to protect the rights of all and promote the common welfare through voluntary action.
  • demonstrate how the guaranteed rights in the Bill of Rights promote the common welfare.

Service Experience:

Although this lesson contains a service project example, decisions about service plans and implementation should be made by students, as age appropriate.
Learn more about the stages of service-learning.

Students will have the opportunity to use their time and talent in the school community by creating posters, during the assessment of the lesson, which illustrate ways in which guaranteed rights ensure the well-being of all people. On their own time outside of class, each group will arrange a meeting with the principal, assistant principal, school counselor, or student leadership council to present their poster. When presenting the poster, students should explain the poster, ask permission to display it, and describe the purpose and importance of displaying the poster for the student body.

Materials:

  • Posterboard
  • Craft materials for décor (chenille stems, puffy paint, felt, etc.)
  • Markers, colored pencils, crayons and poster paints
  • Scissors, glue, and tape
  • Magazines for picture cutout
  • Unit Student Assessment (Handout One) Spanish version (handout Three)
  • Unit Student Assessment Answer Key (Handout Two) Spanish version Four)
Handout 1
Unit Student Assessment
Handout 2
Unit Student Assessment Answer Key
Handout 3
Evaluación de la Unidad
Handout 4
Clave con Respuestas para la Evaluación de la Unidad

Instructional Procedure(s):

Anticipatory Set:
Pose the question, "Do we also have a responsibility to be concerned with the well-being/interests of others as well as our own?" Accept all answers, asking students to defend their opinion.

  • Explain that in the last lesson, the class discussed what responsibilities we have to protect our rights. In this lesson, they will examine the responsibility they may have to promote the common welfare. Define common welfare as what is good for everyone in the group (community, class, country, etc.), not just a few people.

  • Elicit from students things we can agree on which are good for everyone involved.
    • Everyone needs a place to live in safety.
    • Everyone needs food and medical care.
    • Everyone needs to have the opportunity to go to school and get a job.

  • Now describe a situation in which it is difficult to reach a decision that is best for everyone involved. It may be helpful to start with an example from home, then one from school, and finally, one in the larger community. (The teacher may wish to conduct this step of the instructional procedure in debate format).
    • Home decisionShould our family move to a new location?
    • School decisionShould students be able to dress as they wish, without the need for a dress code?
    • Community decisionShould a mall be built in a given area? Consider the pros and cons from each perspective involved (investors, citizens, animals, environment, etc.).

  • Emphasize the ease or difficulty we may experience when trying to promote the common welfare of all (as discovered in the above discussion/debate). Ask, "What happens if we do not put the well-being of all people first?" and "What can we do to fulfill our responsibilities so that the rights and well-being of all people are protected?" The content of this discussion will assist students during the assessment.

Assessment:

    In small groups, each group focusing on one of the five basic guaranteed rights, have students design and create a poster which illustrates three ways in which fulfilling responsibilities of that right ensures the well-being of all people, with the focus on ALL. The poster should include the name of the right, clearly illustrate the three ways the right ensures the well-being of all people, and should be of quality workmanship for display during the experiential component. The following is a suggested rubric. The categories could be given a point value or letter grade rather than outstanding, average, and needs improvement.

Oustanding
Average
Needs Improvement
Clearly and accurately identifies the name of the right on the poster in writing. Identifies the right in writing, but contains some misspellings. Right not identified on the poster in writing.
Uses three illustrations to show how the right ensures the well-being of all people. Uses two illustrations to show how the right ensures the well-being of all people. Uses one or no illustrations to show how the right ensures the well-being of all people.
Quality workmanship is shown. Poster is neat, eye-catching, and has large, colorful illustrations. An effort at quality is made, but one of the following qualities are lacking: Neatness Eye-catching Large, colorful illustrations Quality workmanship is not shown. Two or all of the following qualities are lacking: Neatness Eye-catching Large, colorful illustrations

Unit Student Assessment:

Use Unit Student Assessment (Attachment One) and Unit Student Assessment Answer Key (Attachment Two) for a written unit assessment.

Bibliographical References:

We the People. Calabasas, CA: Center for Civic Education, 1988.

Lesson Developed By:

Lisa Ludwig
Cedar Springs Public Schools
Cedar Springs Middle School
Cedar Springs, MI 49319

Handouts:

Handout 1Print Handout 1

Unit Student Assessment

Part I:

Directions: In the space provided name the guaranteed right being described.
1. The freedom to state your opinion in disagreement with another person or an issue.
2. People may choose to wear clothing or jewelry to identify their faith.
3. Citizens who are of the age 18 or older may cast their ballot in an election.
4. Individuals accused of a crime have the opportunity to defend themselves in a court of law.
5. The government must not discriminate against groups of people based on age, sex, race, or religion.

 

Directions: Write "yes" if the following statement is protected by one of the guaranteed rights. Write "no" if it is not guaranteed as a right.
1. People may choose to believe there is no god.
2. People may publicly express their opinion against or in favor of someone or something in the newspaper or among a group.
3. You may speak when others are speaking.
4. If you can afford it, you may buy a house in any neighborhood you wish to live.
5. You may tell information about others whether it is true or false.

 

PART II: THE ORIGIN OF OUR RIGHTS

Directions: Complete the following statements with accurate information about important documents.

The __________________________________ was added to the Constitution for the purpose of

_____________________________________________________________________________.

Three key words in the Preamble of the Constitution are _______________________________.

They are important because they __________________________________________________

 

PART III: RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES - WHAT DO YOU THINK?

Name one of the five guaranteed rights you learned. Describe two responsibilities you have to protect that right. Then explain, in your own words, why it is important to protect your guaranteed rights.

 

 

Some states deny the right to vote to people who have been found guilty of serious crimes. Do you agree with this limitation to the right to vote? Take a stand for or against this approach, and defend your position with three reasons.

 


Handout 2Print Handout 2

Unit Student Assessment Answer Key

Part I: Rights

  1. Right to freedom of expression
  2. Right to freedom of religion
  3. Right to vote
  4. Right to be treated fairly
  5. Right to be treated equally
  1. Yes
  2. Yes
  3. No
  4. Yes
  5. No

Part II: The Origin of Our Rights

The Bill of Rights was added to the Constitution for the purpose of protecting people from unfair actions of the government which may limit or infringe upon the welfare of citizens.

Three key words in the Preamble of the Constitution are We the People. They are important because they show that authority (to govern) and rights belong to the people.

Part III: Rights and Responsibilities - What do You Think?

Students must select and state one of the following basic guaranteed rights:

  • Right to freedom of expression
  • Right to freedom of religion
  • Right to be treated equally
  • Right to be treated fairly
  • Right to vote

and describe two responsibilities associated with protecting that right. Third, students must describe, in their own words, why it is important to protect our guaranteed rights.

Students must take a stand for or against the stated limitation and defend his or her position with three reasons.

Handout 3Print Handout 3

Evaluación de la Unidad

 Parte I:

Instrucciones: En el espacio en blanco nombra el derecho garantizado que está descrito.

1.

La libertad de expresar tu opinión en desacuerdo con otra persona o un tema.

2.

La gente puede escoger llevar ropa o joyas que identifiquen su fe.

3.

Los ciudadanos que tienen 18 años o más pueden votar en las elecciones.

4.

Los individuos acusados de un crimen tienen la oportunidad de defenderse en la corte de justicia.

5.

El gobierno no debe de discriminar en contra de grupos basado en edad, sexo, raza o religión.

 

Instrucciones: Escribe “Sí” si la siguiente declaración es protegida por uno de los derechos garantizados.  Escribe “No” si no es un derecho garantizado.

1.

La gente puede escoger no creer en dios.

2.

La gente puede expresar públicamente su opinion en contra o a favor de alguien o algo en el periódico o en un grupo.

3.

Tú puedes hablar cuando otros están hablando.

4.

Si puedes pagar, tú puedes comprar una casa en cualquier  vecindario en el que quieras vivir.

5.

Tú puedes dar información verdadera o falsa acerca de otros.

 

PARTE II: EL ORIGEN DE NUESTROS DERECHOS

Instrucciones: Completa las siguientes declaraciones con información correcta acerca de documentos importantes.

La __________________________________ fue agregada a la constitución con el propósito de

_______________________________________________________________________.

Tres palabras claves en el Preámbulo de la Constitución son _______________________________.

Estas palabras son importantes porque __________________________________________________

 

PARTE III: DERECHOS Y RESPONSABILIDADES  - ¿QUE PIENSAS?

Nombra uno de los derechos garantizados que aprendiste.  Describe dos responsabilidades que tú tienes de proteger ese derecho.  Luego explica en tus propias palabras, por qué es importante proteger tus derechos garantizados. 

 

Algunos estados le niegan el derecho a votar a personas que han sido declaradas culpables de serios crímenes.  ¿Estás de acuerdo con esta limitación en el derecho de votar?  Toma una posición a favor o en contra de esta limitación y defiende tu posición con tres razones.

Handout 4Print Handout 4

Clave con Respuestas para la Evaluación de la Unidad

 Parte I: Derechos

1.    Derecho a la libertad de expresión

2.    Derecho a la libertad de religión

3.    Derecho a votar

4.    Derecho a ser tratado justamente

5.    Derecho a ser tratado con igualdad

1.   

2.   

3.    No

4.   

5.    No

Parte II: El Origen de Nuestros Derechos

La Carta de Derechos fue agregada a la Constitución con el propósito de proteger a la gente de acciones injustas del gobierno que puedan limitar o infringir el bienestar de los ciudadanos.

Tres palabras claves en el Preámbulo de la Constitución son Nosotros la Gente. Son importantes porque muestran cómo la autoridad (para gobernar) y los derechos pertenecen a la gente.

Parte III: Derechos y Responsabilidades - ¿Qué piensas tú?

Los Estudiantes deben seleccionar y nombrar uno de los siguientes derechos garantizados:

·  Derecho a la libertad de expresión

·  Derecho a la libertad de religión

·  Derecho a ser tratado con igualdad

·  Derecho a ser tratado justamente

·  Derecho a votar

y describir dos responsabilidades asociadas con la protección de ese derecho.  Tercero, los estudiantes deben describir en sus propias palabras, por qué es importante proteger nuestros derechos garantizados. 

Los estudiantes deben de adoptar una posición a favor o en contra de la limitación y defender su posición con tres razones.

Philanthropy Framework:

Comments

Luann, Teacher – Felch, MI11/1/2007 3:49:06 PM

(The positive aspect of using this lesson was) the students learned to illustrate one of the "rights" and then they had to sell their ideas to the principal. The students learn how to set up an appointment with their principal and then convince her that she should allow them to hang their poster.

Submit a Comment

All rights reserved. Permission is granted to freely use this information for nonprofit (noncommercial), educational purposes only. Copyright must be acknowledged on all copies.