Learning to Give, Philanthropy education resources that teach giving and civic engagement

Civil Rights Leaders; Past and Present
Lesson 3:
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Lesson
Handouts
Academic Standards
Philanthropy Framework

Purpose:

The learner will discover and explain how people in society have worked to promote the common good. They will research famous historical figures in the Civil Rights and Anti-Apartheid Movements, and illustrate how these people focused their efforts on making life better for all.

Duration:

Three Fifty-Minute Class Periods (or five to six class periods if class presentations are used)

Objectives:

The learner will:

  • define and use the terms common good, segregation, and apartheid.
  • research and describe historical leaders that acted as an alternative power structure in America and South African society to improve conditions for the common good.

Service Experience:

Although this lesson contains a service project example, decisions about service plans and implementation should be made by students, as age appropriate.
Learn more about the stages of service-learning.
None for this lesson.

Materials:

  • Student copies of  Historical United States and South African Civil Rights Leaders (Attachment One)
  • Rubric for Historical Research (Attachment Two) 
Handout 1
Historical United States and South African Civil Rights Leaders
Handout 2
Rubric for Historical Research

Instructional Procedure(s):

Anticipatory Set:  On the display board, write the following words: common good, segregation, apartheid. Have the learners recall the definition of Common Good from Lesson One.  The Common Good (n) Involves individual citizens having the commitment and motivation to promote the welfare of the community --even if they must sacrifice their own time, personal preferences or money-- to work together with other members for the greater benefit of all.) Ask the learners to now give you some words that could be used to define segregation (separation) and remind them that in the United States, segregation was viewed as separation of the Caucasian and African-American races. Share with them that apartheid also means -separation (apartness) -and that in South Africa it was viewed as separation of the Caucasian, Bantu, and Colored (mixed) races. Have the learners share their thoughts as to why someone working to promote the common good might choose the elimination of segregation and apartheid as something worthwhile to accomplish. Have the learners share an experience they have encountered or known/read about that resulted in people being treated differently and feeling separate/apart and whether they, the learner, or someone else did something to improve the situation for the common good.

  • Distribute the Historical United States and South African Civil Rights Leaders (Attachment One) and explain to the learners that this list represents some of the historical United States and South African civil rights leaders that have been recognized as powerful individuals in the creation of positive changes in their society.
  • Distribute Rubric for Historical Research (Attachment Two), and discuss the rubrics for the assigned writing task.
  • Encourage the learners to explore the library/media center and research various books and web-sites. Allow three days for preparation and presentation to the class. Give extra credit to learners who use props and/or dress as the civil rights leader they are reporting on might have dressed during the time period, thus making the presentation more authentic.

 ( Teacher Note: Have the learners volunteer for the civil rights leader they want to research. Each learner must select a different leader, unless there are more than 30 learners in the classroom in which case there may be a few duplications. Also, delete the presentation piece of the rubric if you decide against doing the presentation, and only do the paper.)

Assessment:

The learners will be assessed on the writing of their chosen/assigned research paper as well as their sharing of their research findings with the rest of the class in an oral presentation . These assessments will be based upon the Rubric for Historical Research (Attachment Two).

School/Home Connection:

None for this lesson.

Cross-Curriculum Extensions:

  • The learners could design a "Freedom " ( from social injustice) quilt, and each learner can design a square for their civil rights hero.
  • The learners could construct a social justice "Wall of Fame" by creating a poster of their assigned civil rights hero and display it in the school hallway.
  • They could also make a commitment to the ongoing struggle against social injustice by signing a contract that states they will commit to working for equality and freedom for all.

 

Bibliographical References:

None for this lesson.

Lesson Developed By:

Libby Brown
Jackson Public Schools
Jackson High School
Jackson, MI 49201

Handouts:

Handout 1Print Handout 1

Historical United States and South African Civil Rights Leaders

 

1. Ralph Abernathy

2.Ella Baker

3. Daisy Bates

4. Stephen Biko

5. Julian Bond

6. Yusuf Dadoo

7. Medgar Evers

8. Fannie Lou Hamer

9. Jesse Jackson

10. Helen Joseph

11. Martin Luther King, Jr.

12. Anton Lembede

13. John Lewis

14. Chief Albert J. Lutuli

15. Nelson Mandela

16.Peter Mokaba

17. Florence Mophoso

18. Lilian Ngoyi

19. Jordan Ngubane

20. Edgar Nixon

21. Dorothy Nyembe

22. Rosa Parks

23. Hector Peterson

24. A. Phillip Randolph

25. Amelia Robinson

26. Walter Sisulu

27. Oliver Tambo

28. Emmitt Till

29. Desmond Tutu

30. Roy Wilkins

31. Thurgood Marshall

Handout 2Print Handout 2

Rubric for Historical Research

In order to receive a 4 point score, the learner must:

  • Identify and explain at least two ways that this civil rights leader demonstrated good character and personal virtue while addressing the violations of human dignity involving discrimination, persecution, and/or crimes against humanity .
  • Describe the initial responses of individuals to this historic leader as he/she was addressing the violations of human dignity involving discrimination, persecution, and/or crimes against humanity .
  • Describe the impact that this individual has made concerning the concept of democracy and individual rights in the world and how it impacts the learner personally.
  • Share why this leader might have been willing to sacrifice for the benefit of unknown others
  • Use proper grammar, spelling, punctuation, and sentence structure citing three sources of information.
  • Orally present research findings in a clear, interesting, and understandable voice using props and/or dress as the civil rights leader they are reporting on might have dressed during the time period,

In order to receive a 3 point score, the learner must:

  • Identify and explain at least one way that this civil rights leader demonstrated good character and personal virtue while addressing the violations of human dignity involving discrimination, persecution, and/or crimes against humanity .
  • Describe the initial responses of individuals to this historic leader as he/she was addressing the violations of human dignity involving discrimination, persecution, and/or crimes against humanity .
  • Describe the impact that this individual has made concerning the concept of democracy and individual rights in the world
  • Share why this leader might have been willing to sacrifice for the benefit of unknown others
  • Use proper grammar, spelling, punctuation, and sentence structure citing two sources of information.
  • Orally present research findings in a clear , interesting,and understandable voice.

In order to receive a 2 point score, the learner must:

  • Identify and explain at least one way that this civil rights leader demonstrated good character and personal virtue while addressing the violations of human dignity involving discrimination, persecution, and/or crimes against humanity .
  • Describe the initial responses of individuals to this historic leader as he/she was addressing the violations of human dignity involving discrimination, persecution, and/or crimes against humanity .
  • Describe the impact that this individual has made concerning the concept of democracy and individual rights in the world
  • Share why this leader might have been willing to sacrifice for the benefit of unknown others
  • Use proper grammar, spelling, punctuation, and sentence structure citing one source of information.
  • Orally present research findings in a clear and understandable voice

In order to receive a 1 point score, the learner must:

  • Identify and explain at least one way that this civil rights leader demonstrated good character and personal virtue while addressing the violations of human dignity involving discrimination, persecution, and/or crimes against humanity
  • Describe the impact that this individual has made concerning the concept of democracy and individual rights in the world
  • Use proper grammar, spelling, punctuation, and sentence structure.
  • Orally present research findings.

Philanthropy Framework:

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