Learning to Give, Philanthropy education resources that teach giving and civic engagement

Give It Back from a Snack
Unit of 5 lessons
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Unit Overview:

Students will learn about entrepreneurship and philanthropy by selling snacks in school. They conduct a school-wide survey and analyze the results to determine which snacks to sell. They learn money values and learn to make change. Using the profits from the snack sale, the students purchase an item to donate for the common good.

Unit Purpose:

This unit will help students develop a better understanding of the basic nutritional needs and how those are vital for a person's health. This will give background information leading to the development of the service learning project to raise funds for an organization of their choice. Non profit organizations need funds from many sources to thrive. Students will work cooperatively to organize a fundraiser with the intent of a philanthropic outcome. They will survey the school population and analyze the results of those surveys to determine which snacks will be appropriate to sell as a fundraiser for their school. Students will determine where the proceeds will be donated.

Unit Objectives:

The learners will:

  • discuss different ways to earn money.
  • list different uses for money (spend, save, donate, earn).
  • identify choices that having money allows us.
  • draw a picture of something that could benefit the common good.
  • explain that money earned can be used to purchase things for the common good.
  • differentiate between self-interest and philanthropy.
  • give examples of how a philanthropist gives time, talent or treasure for the common good.
  • conduct and analyze a survey.
  • classify snacks into general categories.
  • define producers and consumers.
  • come to a group consensus.
  • sort and group coins by value.
  • differentiate between borrowing money and paying interest.
  • plan and estimate cost of supplies needed for a snack.
  • interpret data from a chart or graph.
  • list attributes of effective advertising.
  • design colorful posters advertising the project.
  • include the philanthropic purpose of the project on his/her poster.
  • utilize correct punctuation and capitalization in his/her letter.
  • correctly formulate complete thoughts in the letter.
  • use correct friendly-letter format.
  • practice making change with money
  • predict the consumer wants
  • execute the sale of snacks.
  • sort the money, roll the coins, wrap the bills and count the money.
  • determine the amount of profit from the sale.
  • write thank-you notes.
  • repay the borrowed money.
  • conduct a ceremony to celebrate the giving of the gift purchased from the profits.

Service Experience:

Although lessons in this unit contain service project examples, decisions about service plans and implementation should be made by students, as age appropriate.

In Lesson Five: The Philanthropy Market Is Open Today the class earns money in a snack sale that requires their time and donated items. They purchase an item that benefits the whole class, school or members of the community. They present the gift in a ceremonial fashion. (For example, one teacher and her first graders purchased a picnic table for the school grounds. They wrapped the gift with a large ribbon around it and the teacher conducted a ribbon-cutting ceremony with the other classes and school principal.)

Unit Assessment:

In Lesson Five: The Philanthropy Market Is Open Today the class earns money in a snack sale that requires their time and donated items. They purchase an item that benefits the whole class, school or members of the community. They present the gift in a ceremonial fashion. (For example, one teacher and her first graders purchased a picnic table for the school grounds. They wrapped the gift with a large ribbon around it and the teacher conducted a ribbon-cutting ceremony with the other classes and school principal.)

School/Home Connection:

  • “Copy-and-Paste” Class/School Newsletter Information Insert:
    Our class is organizing an exciting event that involves the whole school. We are setting up a market with the goal of earning money to purchase a gift for the common good of the school or community. The students in our class will learn about money values, counting money and making change. They will solicit volunteers and advertise their sale to students in the whole school. They will make posters and write letters. They will make important decisions as a group regarding what to sell, how much to charge and how to spend the money for the good of a larger group of people. One of our important focuses in this lesson is philanthropy and volunteering.

  • Interactive Parent / Student Homework:
    In Lesson Three: Appeal for the Meal, the students write letters home in which they ask their parents to volunteer in the snack sale in a manner of their choosing. The students learn that volunteering requires a freedom of choice. They may help their parents prepare the snack at home.

Notes for Teaching:

Notes are contained in the individual lessons.

State Curriculum and Philanthropy Theme Frameworks:

See individual lessons for benchmark detail.

Lessons Developed By:

Connie Ide
Ravenna Public Schools
Beechnau Elementary
12322 Ravenna Rd.
Ravenna, MI 49451

Julie Schexnaildre
St. Charles Community Schools
Miller School
302 Fulton
St. Charles, MI 48655

Mona Suchocki
Saginaw Township Community Schools
Handley Elementary School
3021 Court Street
Saginaw, MI 48602

Pat Ognisanti
Saginaw Township Community Schools
Handley Elementary School
3021 Court Street
Saginaw, MI 48602

Perry Heppler
Lakeshore Public Schools
Hollywood Elementary
143 E. John Beers Rd.
Stevensville, MI 49127

Sandra Shirton
Battle Creek Public Schools
McKinley School
400 NE Capital Ave
Battle Creek, MI 49017

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